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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
boehner doesn't have the leverage he used to have. on a conference call he told house republicans they had to avoid the nasty showdowns that mark so much of the last two years. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell was the number one obstructionist in the president's first term. now he tells "the wall street journal" he'll do whatever it takes to get a deal. i'd be willing to pay the ransom if e we thought we were going to get the hostage out. but the hostage is what? entitlement spending. mcconnell's intention, he's willing to agree to a dollar of new taxes for every dollar in cuts. what a difference an election makes. >> i'm going to ask a question on the stage. they seau had a real spending cuts deal, 10 to 1. spending cuts to tax increases. speaker, you're already shaking your head. but who on this stage would walk away from that deal? would you raise your hand about not raising taxes. you'd walk away on the 10-1 deal? [ applause ] >> all right. just to bring everybody up to speed, remember in 2011, republicans would not take a 10 to 1 tax cut deal. now today mitch mcconnell is will
the president sat between house speaker john boehner and senate majority leader harry reid calling for cooperation and compromise. >> we've got to make sure that taxes don't go up on middle-class families, that our economy remains strong, that we're creating jobs, and that's an agenda that democrats and republicans and independents, people all across the country, share. so, our challenge is to make sure that, you know, we are able to cooperate together, work together. >> joining me now for more, congressional reporter for "the washington post" ed o'keefe and national journal correspondent nancy cook. good morning both of you. last time we saw those three together, sort of a kumbayah moment when you have reid and boehner and mcconnell together. did you get a sense, ed, putting revenue on the table meant republicans were open to tax hikes for those makes $250,000 or more? >> no, they're not. they still say they don't want to see that increase. by talking about revenues the idea is you close loopholes, find a way to perhaps limit deductions and create revenue that way. but you know, b
directly at odds with house speaker john boehner. >> could you accept a deal that does not include tax rate increases for the wealthy? we've seen talk about a possible compromise that could leave rates the same but cap deductions for high-income earners. is that something that's acceptable? >> no. >> not at all no, way? >> no. the preponderance made it very clear in his campaign that there are not enough -- what you just described is a formula and a blueprint for hampering our future. you cannot go forward -- you have to cut some investments. if you cut too many you are hampering growth, you're hampering education, investments for the future. >> and even thousands of miles away it appears president obama is still focused on those negotiations. while touring a royal monastery with secretary of state clinton in thailand the president was overheard mentioning the budget talks to a monk. the president later clarified his comments -- >> he's not any monk. >> no. >> he has some big i vestments in the stock market. >> he later clarified his comments at a news conference. >> yes, we were working on
is there to do? the signals from john boehner, the speaker of the house, are that he's got some more leverage with his republican caucus than he had back in the day, and that there is talk of coming up with more revenue. maybe not calling it a tax increase, not a rate increase, but finding some way to raise some more money. >> right. you know, andrea, i hate to sound an optimistic note when it comes to politics, but i do think the signals coming out of john boehner's sort of world, and out of president obama's statement last week is that there can be some common ground here, that president obama, i think, clearly has some leverage due to what happened in the, in his own race, as well as at the senate level. so i think he has that. and then john boehner, i think a little bit more questionable in how much more leverage he has within his own caucus, but we shall see. if both of them can sort of say, look, let's do this, this is important to the country, let's move on, we can disagree about lots of other things, but we're going to compromise and move forward. whether that compromise is not raisin
-like reaction, not a cliff-like reaction, and the leaders of wall street will help john boehner to make a better deal rather than pressuring him to make a deal that's bad for the economy and the fear that we don't get a deal will lead to getting a deal because the pressure correctly applied. >> the issue here is will we go over the cliff? i stopped saying cliff. sorry. okay, okay. but i think the question is do we get to the grassy gradual slope or not and then level roonlg. this is the first time since 2010 that's obama's had the leverage with republicans and saying there, you mentioned that poll yesterday adding to the leverage because, voters, you think to go over this so-called cliff and referring to the nervousness. who will you blame? >> republicans. >> republicans. that's more leverage of obama on that question and look at. yeah, he didn't draw that red line as krystal said at the beginning but as close to be an absolutist for incomes over $250,000 as he can be. this is an issue that he ran on. this bothers him ruled by republicans two years ago and taxes are not where they should be hist
.6 trillion in new taxes just isn't serious. it's a joke. a joke. >> house speaker john boehner has been far milder in this rhetoric. according to politico, some house republicans might consider a tax hike on millionaires. many republican lawmakers privately concede that the 2012 election left them far short of a mandate on taxes. and if urged by democrats to raise rates on the megawealthy, they will have a tough time resisting. for the record, president obama's position sounds much more in line with senator sanders' way of thinking. >> there are some tough things that have to be done, but there's a way of doing this that does not hurt middle class families, that does not hurt our seniors, doesn't hurt families with disabled kids. >> let's bring in ruth conif, political editor for the progressive magazine. also with us tonight, e.j. dionne, msnbc contributor, "washington post" columnist and author of the book "our divided political heart." great to have both of you with us tonight. ruth, you first. you know, this could set up to be a moment of real disappointment for liberals if the democrat
a split and one of the interesting ways you can follow it has to do with what -- john boehner versus paul ryan. boehner is pushing for conference shame, republican congresswoman rogers while ryan is pushing tom price who used to run the conservative caucus in the house. if most of the caucus is getting behind them then it's a sign they'll dig in their heels. if they're going with boehner, it's a sign they'll deal. >> i want to bring in a democrat on both the armed services committee and select committee on intelligence and the fiscal cliff if i might. do you think the republicans will come to play? >> i believe that they will. it's my hope that everyone has gotten the message loud and clear that the american people expect us to compromise, democrats and republicans coming together to solve the fiscal cliff issue but in a balanced way and that is certainly what president obama has campaigned on protecting a strong middle class, allowing the tax cuts to expire above $250,000, but we can't be afraid to compromise but we can do that without compromising our principles. >> is part of this deal
. the biggest unknown variable here is what the republican conference is going to do and whether boehner can rally the guys to get them on board. that is the biggest question here, because no matter what they decide among the leaders, they have to get it past the house and the senate. >> and you know, there is also compromise idea being floated around right now to keep the rates the same, but eliminate the deductions for the rich. nancy pelosi making her position on that very, very clear. take a listen to this. >> is that something that is acceptable? >> no. >> nott all, no way? >> no, the president made it very clear in his campaign that there is not enough, there are not enough resources -- what you just described as a formula and a blueprint for hammering our future. >> you know, dana, if she is hardening her stance here as we watch the rhetoric, does it matter here, because nancy p pelosi, really, how big of a seat does she have at the table right now? >> no. she is, and something of a highchair at this point. she is not particularly relevant to this debate. the president was nowhere nea
that john boehner had with all of you folks saying get in line, we actually have to have a record to run on in 2014. we can't be obstructionists anymore. the american people have spoken in the election, let's do something. newt gingrich, former speaker of the house, failed presidential candidate, giving advice to the republican party, i would advise the republican party to take that with a huge salt lick. >> yeah. >> ashley, you were on the trail covering romney and there for the last days of his candidacy. do you sense now there is supposedly a come to jesus moment happening within the republican party, that the moderate wing will have a strong voice? >> well, i mean one thing you're seeing before the election, before the president won re-election and seemed like leaders in congress were going to be more willing to compromise, governor romney was sounding a bipartisan theme even during the election. even before, some people would argue the president has a mandate, some wouldn't, bipartisanship was what was persuading the most voters on the trail. after the election there's probably goin
and this matters for these negotiations john boehner's position is he is open to revenue, but not if it includes increasing the top tax rate. he is only doing it through some mystery process of tax reform where you have a large amount of revenue, but still at 35% of the top tax rate or if boehner has his druthers, have a lower tax rate maybe 28% as in simpson-bowles. the white house doesn't think the math will work out. they believe even when it can, you have to do such radical things like eliminating charitable deduction at the top brackets entirely it wouldn't be worth doing if you could. their view it is not a compromise to say in a future tax reform process you're going to get that money, they're not going to sign anything that doesn't include the top tax rate going up at the end of december. >> justin you were in the room with the president today. can you confirm that quote that the huffington post has, i am not going to budge, i said in 2010 i'm going to do this once and i meant it? >> i actually don't remember if those are his exact words, and also the president ask
rejected the mitt romney, john boehner solution for tax reform. >> what i will not do is to have a process that is vague, that says we're going to sort of, kind of raise revenue through dynamic scoring or closing loopholes that have not been identified. and the reason i won't do that is because i don't want to find ourselves in a position six months from now or a year from now, where lo and behold, the only way to close the deficit is to sock it to middle class families. >> now, that is the classiest way i have ever seen anybody say, you know what, somebody's got to pick up the bar tab, boys. this is what president obama ran against in the presidential election. mitt romney's approach to tax reform was, trust me. the american public wanted specifics. and president obama continued to give specifics today, but the economy wasn't the only thing on the president's mind today. earlier in the day, here's another development. ambassador to the united nations, susan rice came under fire from republican senators. senators john mccain and lindsey graham, back at it, trying to trump up the ambassador
and the ongoing relationship with boehner and mcconnell because he's going to have to be a different kind of leader with them. he talked about it in the press conference a bit the other day. he needs to reach out to them the way he's reached out to people on staten island and dealt with the two governors, christie and cuomo, who are two pretty demanding guys as well. and based on their public and private comments have been very happy with the president's leadership and his government. >> i just wonder if it's fair to make a parallel when you look at the president's response to sandy which has had and continues to have just devastating effects on the economy for businesses and the reaction to the bp oil spill which seemed slow in coming because that was devastating as well to a different part of the country. >> he certainly was. he was very slow to respond to people in the gulf coast. >> in terms of appearances. >> i think things have changed, though, over the past couple years. and i suspect that, you know, even the president's closest allies will say that it was a very hard adjustment go
can pass the alternative. but it's your problem to get the votes. and boehner would be well put not to try to cut a deal with obama but instead to say paul ryan's going to bring a solution to the fix, we're going to gather votes for it. i guarantee you, you'll get the right to have a democratic substitute. and if you can get enough republicans to vote for it, terrific. but they do not have an obligation to concede that the only mandate in washington is the president's. >> you're talking about chains hiring people for 29 hours. i'm hearing that from small business owners across pensacola. >> yeah. >> my own district. on election night i got three different e-mails from small business owners going it's sad -- and i said this on the air a couple days ago. they said i'm going to have to put these people on for less than 30 hours and i'm going to lose my best people. i can choose to do that or fire six, seven people because my margins are so small i'm fighting to keep my business open. >> you track the number of layoffs and closures in the first week since the election, it's sobering
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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